We sponsor research to bring about change in how women and girls are dealt with in the criminal justice system

Our research listings

Research Papers and Briefings

At the end of their year on the Griffins Society Fellowship Programme, Fellows produce a 10,000 word Research Paper on their findings. Research Papers are available here to view or download as a PDF (the size of each file is given).  

For all papers you will find the REPORT IN FULL, and also a single-page ABSTRACT.  For more recent papers, an EXECUTIVE SUMMARY is also available.

Fellows' research can be freely copied and distributed as long as the author and the Griffins Society are credited.


 

Exploring provisions for women in approved premises

Author: 
Gilliam McLeish
Published: 
2005

This study explores female need and provision within Approved Premises settings, primarily the particular needs of female residents/offenders including bailees, probationers and licensees. The study examines the structure of support to help women regain control of their lives, to empower them to progress to the next stage, ie. semi independent/independent living. It aims to highlight the strengths, weaknesses and, effectiveness of regimes in reducing offending for women; and to identify any gaps which exist. NB. The term Approved Premises refers to (Home Office) defined standards of practice.

Download PDF - 87.79 KB

Last Chance: older women through the Criminal Justice System

Author: 
Carlie Newman
Published: 
2005

This research project focusses on older women in the criminal justice system and aimed to: • ascertain what proportion of older women offenders (50+) make up the growing prison population; • examine community sentences and other punishments given as an alternative to custody, for this group; • provide a focus on the rehabilitation and resettlement of older women on their release from prison, especially those with drug and alcohol problems; • examine the role of outside agencies in the resettlement of older women offenders and to determine their effectiveness. The research is based on interviews with offenders, magistrates, judges, justices’ clerks, probation officers, representatives of voluntary organisations, a deputy prison governor and government ministers.

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Download PDF - 1.04 MB