We sponsor research to bring about change in how women and girls are dealt with in the criminal justice system

Our research listings

Research Papers and Briefings

At the end of their year on the Griffins Society Fellowship Programme, Fellows produce a 10,000 word Research Paper on their findings. Research Papers are available here to view or download as a PDF (the size of each file is given).  

For all papers you will find the REPORT IN FULL, and also a single-page ABSTRACT.  For more recent papers, an EXECUTIVE SUMMARY is also available.

Fellows' research can be freely copied and distributed as long as the author and the Griffins Society are credited.


 

Missing Voices: Why women engage with, or withdraw from, community sentences

Author: 
Sue Jordan
Published: 
2013

Baroness Corston noted the ‘high rate’ of women in custody for breach and Hedderman calculated that a large proportion of the 60% of women imprisoned under the umbrella of ‘other offences’, will be there for breaching community sentences. Despite the interest in the subject, there appears to be little available research. This project was therefore undertaken to investigate the following issues: • What are the main barriers to women engaging with community orders and are there clear patterns that are not recognised by contemporary practice? • Are the aims of community orders understood and/or shared by the women involved? • Does the rigidity of structure inherent in these orders affect women differently? The research is based on interviews with women serving sentences for breach of community orders (including suspended sentence orders) in HMP New Hall and the Together Women Project in Hull. Whilst this research is small-scale in scope, it is hoped that the findings will inspire more extensive research in the future.

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Moving forward: empowering women to desist from offending

Author: 
Shelly-Ann McDermott
Published: 
2012

This qualitative research explores women’s experiences of empowerment, desistance and compliance. The main objective was to capture women’s insights about their experiences of empowerment during their engagement with enforced community sentences. The questions asked were: • What factors do women identify as important for desistance? • What is empowerment? • Is being empowered an important part of desistance? • Does enforced contact with interventions empower women, or does a court order undermine empowerment? • What contributes to women’s decisions about engagement and compliance? The study engaged directly with seven women sentenced to woman-specific court orders delivered within London Probation. [NB. From November 2010, London Probation implemented two woman-specific Specified Activity Requirements, available within a Community Order or Suspended Sentence Order. The two activities are the Structured Supervision for Women (SSW) one-to-one programme and sessions with Women Ahead at the Jagonari Women's Education and Resource Centre (WERC).]

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A new probation partnership? Working with women to improve compliance with community sentences

Author: 
Kate Storer
Published: 
2003

Historically, little research had been conducted on the reasons for non-compliance with community sentences, and even less relating to female offenders. This research project focused on women subject to community sentences, to identify factors that may influence their attendance rates. The study concentrated on four areas relevant to female compliance with CROs and CPROs: consistency of officer; physical appearance of the office; characteristics of female offenders; and attitudes towards Probation/Awareness of the role of the Probation Service. The research is based on case studies and in depth interviews with three women and their supervising probation officers.

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